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#368465 - 10/03/2017 05:52 Re: Finished project [Re: JBjorgen]
JBjorgen
carpal tunnel

Registered: 19/01/2002
Posts: 3378
Loc: Guadalajara, MX
Nice work! Actually, I think the crib (cot?) looks every bit as complex as the desk.

I'm still looking for a place to buy hardwoods here in Guadalajara. The desk is just made from whatever I could find at Home Depot, but I'd love to do some projects like your coffee table with some quality wood. Not sure if they would have the same stuff as we have in the US, but they have different hardwoods that are quite beautiful.

I'm also thinking about trying my hand at some raw wood furniture projects. I've been a little jazzed to try it since we bought our dining room table, which is a big piece of mesquite. I'll have to see if I can dig up a picture.
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~ John

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#368466 - 10/03/2017 06:03 Re: Finished project [Re: JBjorgen]
JBjorgen
carpal tunnel

Registered: 19/01/2002
Posts: 3378
Loc: Guadalajara, MX
Originally Posted By: JBjorgen
I'll have to see if I can dig up a picture.


Found one. Just ignore the child at the end of the table.

I had this custom made for $5500 pesos or roughly $275 USD. I'm thinking a piece of mesquite this big would be worth a bit more than that in the US.



Attachments
IMG_0594.jpg


_________________________
~ John

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#368467 - 10/03/2017 11:40 Re: Finished project [Re: tahir]
Tim
veteran

Registered: 25/04/2000
Posts: 1430
Loc: Arizona
You guys continuously amaze me.

The other day I was impressed that I used an impact driver correctly, didn't lose a digit, didn't bring the house down, and managed to remove and then reinstall a set of blinds clips successfully.

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#368468 - 10/03/2017 12:38 Re: Finished project [Re: JBjorgen]
mlord
carpal tunnel

Registered: 29/08/2000
Posts: 13469
Loc: Canada
Originally Posted By: JBjorgen
I had this custom made for $5500 pesos or roughly $275 USD. I'm thinking a piece of mesquite this big would be worth a bit more than that in the US.

I am about to become part-owner of a wood supply business, and one of their specialties is large slabs like that one. They have a couple of very large custom rigs for milling the raw wood dead flat with parallel faces. The slabs are then offered in that form, requiring fine sanding, a finish, and legs. But they'll also pre-finish and/or add legs as asked. Quite the sight, a room full of those!

If all goes well, I do hope the next worktable in my office here will be a live edge slab.

Cheers!

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#368469 - 10/03/2017 13:35 Re: Finished project [Re: mlord]
andy
carpal tunnel

Registered: 10/06/1999
Posts: 5651
Loc: Wivenhoe, Essex, UK
Originally Posted By: mlord
The slabs are then offered in that form, requiring fine sanding, a finish, and legs.


They sound great, can you pop a couple in the mail wink
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Remind me to change my signature to something more interesting someday

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#368470 - 10/03/2017 17:09 Re: Finished project [Re: andy]
JBjorgen
carpal tunnel

Registered: 19/01/2002
Posts: 3378
Loc: Guadalajara, MX
Originally Posted By: andy

They sound great, can you pop a couple in the mail wink


Yeah, my wife says "You realize that we have to take that with us whenever we go back to the US." (which won't be anytime soon) I'm trying not to imagine what it'll cost to ship that thing. It might be cheaper to buy a trailer and tow it up and then sell the trailer on the other side.

Which, since the conversation is wandering anyway, reminds me of a story. When I was in Belize, there was a guy who drove down every winter from the US with a trailer for his belongings. Every year, he would rebuild the box of the trailer completely out of mahogany (which is dirt cheap in Belize), then tow it back to the US. Because it was a US tagged trailer, he didn't pay any import duty on the trailer itself. He would then disassemble the trailer, sell all the wood to help finance his trip, and rebuild the trailer out of whatever was cheap to bring back down. I always thought it was a cool way to work the system.
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~ John

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#368471 - 10/03/2017 17:16 Re: Finished project [Re: mlord]
JBjorgen
carpal tunnel

Registered: 19/01/2002
Posts: 3378
Loc: Guadalajara, MX
Originally Posted By: mlord


If all goes well, I do hope the next worktable in my office here will be a live edge slab.



Just a word of warning, even if they start out dead flat, they may not stay dead flat. The mesquite table changes with the seasons and the humidity. Of course, none of the houses here have climate control, so your experience may vary.

Not sure if this is avoidable through proper maintenance or if the wood wasn't dried properly or what. I think it's just the nature of this type of wood and it's reaction to the evironment.
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~ John

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#368472 - 10/03/2017 17:25 Re: Finished project [Re: JBjorgen]
mlord
carpal tunnel

Registered: 29/08/2000
Posts: 13469
Loc: Canada
That's just what wood does (as part of "seasonal wood movement"), due to the differences between tangential and radial shrinkage ratios. It can be compensated for by how a slab is cut at the sawmill, or through construction techniques.

But with a big slab cut from anywhere except dead center down the tree trunk, it will not stay totally flat from season to season. Bracing it with a frame structure to keep it more flat is one solution, though in the long run it may crack/split if prevented from warping. Sealing it with a humidity-blocking finish is another approach, but difficult to achieve in practice.

An interesting tidbit I have learned from the biz, is that platters (cheeseboards, breadboards, trophy mounts, etc..) can be sliced diagonally from a whole trunk segment, in such a way that the tangential and radial shrinkage ends up dead even. So the small platters don't warp (much). Just gotta pick the right angle of cut for the wood species in question.

Cheers


Attachments
platters.jpg

Description: Diagonally sliced platters.



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#368473 - 10/03/2017 18:03 Re: Finished project [Re: JBjorgen]
tfabris
carpal tunnel

Registered: 20/12/1999
Posts: 30531
Loc: Seattle, WA
Originally Posted By: JBjorgen
He would then disassemble the trailer, sell all the wood to help finance his trip, and rebuild the trailer


Wait, you're telling me this guy *smuggled mahogany into the US* by building his trailer out of it? That is hilarious and amazing. That's like building a boat out of cocaine. I'm wondering just how much profit one could make by that. Is the price of mahogany in the US so high that it's really worth his time to do the construction/deconstruction?
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Tony Fabris

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#368474 - 10/03/2017 20:22 Re: Finished project [Re: JBjorgen]
peter
carpal tunnel

Registered: 13/07/2000
Posts: 4138
Loc: Cambridge, England
It's not just about import duty. Mahogany is IUCN "vulnerable" and is in CITES Appendix II. Folks should really not be messing with that stuff.

Peter

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#368475 - 11/03/2017 00:05 Re: Finished project [Re: peter]
tfabris
carpal tunnel

Registered: 20/12/1999
Posts: 30531
Loc: Seattle, WA
Interesting! Looked up the Wikipedia article on it, and learned (among other things) that the Belize coat of arms has a mahogany tree on it.
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Tony Fabris

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#368476 - 12/03/2017 07:10 Re: Finished project [Re: tfabris]
JBjorgen
carpal tunnel

Registered: 19/01/2002
Posts: 3378
Loc: Guadalajara, MX
Originally Posted By: tfabris
Interesting! Looked up the Wikipedia article on it, and learned (among other things) that the Belize coat of arms has a mahogany tree on it.


Most of the slaves were brought in to cut first logwood, valued in its use of making dyes, then later mahogany. This is because treaties forbade the production of plantation crops.

The village I lived in, Gales Point, started out as a settlement of escaped slaves that lived in the area and eventually settled on the peninsula (according to the local lore).

Logging is also represented in the flag by the wreath of leaves, the tools pictured in the coat of arms and the motto "Sub Umbra Floreo" which in latin means, “Under The Shade I Flourish."
_________________________
~ John

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#368479 - 17/03/2017 14:44 Re: Finished project [Re: andy]
tahir
pooh-bah

Registered: 27/02/2004
Posts: 1658
Loc: London
Originally Posted By: andy
They sound great, can you pop a couple in the mail wink


There are UK firms that do this. One that I looked at did all sorts of strange species; cedar, horse chestnut, tulip etc, all UK grown.

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